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Home Inspector FAQ'S Handyman On Site
Serving Oakville, Burlington, Milton, Waterdown, Dundas, Ancaster,  Hamilton, Stoney Creek and Grimsby
Expose Home Inspections Inc.
A higher quality of home inspections home defects home defects
Can you find what’s wrong in these pictures?
Q: Home Inspection? A: A good home inspection includes a thorough examination and assessment of all the main components of a house from the top of the roof to depths of the basement. Sure, anyone can get a flashlight with pen\paper and make note of that gaping hole in the side of the house. But can they tell if a roof is almost worn out or that the electrical system is wired properly? My home inspections examine all the major home components. This investigation includes a thorough examination of the home’s exterior, roofing, attic areas, electrical components, plumbing,heating and air conditioning and the basement or crawlspace. Depending on the size and type of house, a typical home inspection’s length of time can range from three to four hours. This inspection will produce a detailed report identifying all major areas of defects. Q: When should I have a Home Inspection?   A: On an existing home, a resale inspection usually occurs within five to ten days following the signing of the contract. The sales contract typically identifies explicitly a period of time in an inspection clause. The home buyer should discuss the details of this clause with the Realtor and understand the timing of the inspection and request for repairs. Q: Why should I have a Home Inspection? A: Improper repairs made to a home – particularly an existing home. Over time, a house needs on-going maintenance, repairs and replacement of some components. But not all homes are maintained or repaired by qualified or licensed trades-people. Since one rarely knows the maintenance history of an existing home, an inspection will reveal any critical problems prior to purchase. Some people ask why they should have a new home inspected? After all, all the components are new and a local building inspector may have inspected the house. Unfortunately, because of the rapid growth in the GTA and Ontario, many local building inspectors do not have the time to spend hours reviewing a home, and some jurisdictions in Ontario do not have local building inspectors even though Ontario has a state mandated building code. Additionally, Ontario does not require that builders be licensed. Some builders are not proficient in building codes, methods or materials. An individual may purchase a house that may soon require expensive repairs or may even become life threatening. Hiring a home inspector will ensure that one’s home does not possess these problems.  Q: Why do prices for Home Inspections vary so much?  A: Each home inspector establishes pricing based on the specifics of the house. Generally, the price quote depends upon the size of the home, the complexity of the inspection and the age of the home. On average, a buyer can expect to pay between $350 and $600 for an average home inspection. Consumers can best determine why price quotes differ among the potential inspectors by asking questions regarding the inspection process and the report that the inspector will provide.  Q: What questions should I ask a potential inspector to find the one that      best suits me? A: Buyers may wish to ask the following questions:   • What parts of the house will you inspect?   • How long will the inspection take?   • What type of report will I receive?   • When may I expect a report?   • May I accompany you and ask questions as you inspect?   • What will the inspection cost? Q: What if the builder or seller does follow my inspector’s recommendations? A: This frequently happens. No flawless house exists – even a new or custom built home. With an existing home purchase, the buyer must determine what items the seller should fix and what items the buyer can repair. Most home inspectors can assist the buyer with providing a range of estimates for repairing some of the defects. Builders of new homes, whether spec or custom, are required to build to the mandated minimum codes. If this does not occur, the buyer may have legal recourse and should consult a real estate attorney. Q: What’s not in a home inspection? A: An insurance policy, guarantee or warranty on the home     An invasive or destructive exercise Intended to identify concealed defects     A code or design review     Ability to predict the future or the remaining life of components     An environmental review or energy audit  
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1-800-780-5109
FAQ'S
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Expose Home Inspections
Expose Home Inspections Inc.
A higher quality of home inspections
1-800-780-5109
Questions?
Can you find what’s wrong in these pictures?
Q: Home Inspection? A: A good home inspection includes a thorough examination and assessment of all the main components of a house from the top of the roof to depths of the basement. Sure, anyone can get a flashlight with pen\paper and make note of that gaping hole in the side of the house. But can they tell if a roof is almost worn out or that the electrical system is wired properly? My home inspections examine all the major home components. This investigation includes a thorough examination of the home’s exterior, roofing, attic areas, electrical components, plumbing,heating and air conditioning and the basement or crawlspace. Depending on the size and type of house, a typical home inspection’s length of time can range from three to four hours. This inspection will produce a detailed report identifying all major areas of defects. Q: When should I have a Home Inspection?   A: On an existing home, a resale inspection usually occurs within five to ten days following the signing of the contract. The sales contract typically identifies explicitly a period of time in an inspection clause. The home buyer should discuss the details of this clause with the Realtor and understand the timing of the inspection and request for repairs. Q: Why should I have a Home Inspection? A: Improper repairs made to a home – particularly an existing home. Over time, a house needs on-going maintenance, repairs and replacement of some components. But not all homes are maintained or repaired by qualified or licensed trades-people. Since one rarely knows the maintenance history of an existing home, an inspection will reveal any critical problems prior to purchase. Some people ask why they should have a new home inspected? After all, all the components are new and a local building inspector may have inspected the house. Unfortunately, because of the rapid growth in the GTA and Ontario, many local building inspectors do not have the time to spend hours reviewing a home, and some jurisdictions in Ontario do not have local building inspectors even though Ontario has a state mandated building code. Additionally, Ontario does not require that builders be licensed. Some builders are not proficient in building codes, methods or materials. An individual may purchase a house that may soon require expensive repairs or may even become life threatening. Hiring a home inspector will ensure that one’s home does not possess these problems. Q: Why do prices for Home Inspections vary so much?  A: Each home inspector establishes pricing based on the specifics of the house. Generally, the price quote depends upon the size of the home, the complexity of the inspection and the age of the home. On average, a buyer can expect to pay between $350 and $600 for an average home inspection. Consumers can best determine why price quotes differ among the potential inspectors by asking questions regarding the inspection process and the report that the inspector will provide. Q: What questions should I ask a potential inspector to find the one that      best suits me? A: Buyers may wish to ask the following questions:   • What parts of the house will you inspect?   • How long will the inspection take?   • What type of report will I receive?   • When may I expect a report?   • May I accompany you and ask questions as you inspect?   • What will the inspection cost? Q: What if the builder or seller does follow my inspector’s recommendations? A: This frequently happens. No flawless house exists – even a new or custom built home. With an existing home purchase, the buyer must determine what items the seller should fix and what items the buyer can repair. Most home inspectors can assist the buyer with providing a range of estimates for repairing some of the defects. Builders of new homes, whether spec or custom, are required to build to the mandated minimum codes. If this does not occur, the buyer may have legal recourse and should consult a real estate attorney. Q: What’s not in a home inspection? A: An insurance policy, guarantee or warranty on the home     An invasive or destructive exercise Intended to identify concealed defects     A code or design review     Ability to predict the future or the remaining life of components     An environmental review or energy audit  
Serving Oakville, Burlington, Milton, Waterdown, Dundas, Ancaster,  Hamilton, Stoney Creek and Grimsby
Community Supporter
Copyright @ 2013 Handyman On Site Inc.  All Rights Reserved